Return to 432hz as Concert Pitch!

Audios Amigos is harmonically tuned to the frequency of 432hz. Apparently in the early 1900s the Nazis and Americans decided concert pitch should be 440hz. After much debate and dissent among many composers around the world it was made official in 1953. Isn’t that enough of a reason to return to 432hz? Here is some more interesting reading on the subject. Let us know what you think of this controversy in the comments section below!

“432hz vibrates/oscillates on the principles of natural harmonic wave propagation and unifies with the properties of light, time, space, matter, gravity and electromagnetism. Our Sun, Saturn, Earth and Moon, all exhibit ratio’s of the number 432. Concert pitch A=432hz pitch can have profound positive effects on consciousness and also on the cellular level of our bodies. By retuning musical instruments and using concert pitch at A=432hz instead of A=440Hz, you can feel the difference of connecting awareness to natural resonance.” Source- Omega432

I’ve just been reading something about A-432hz: the, allegedly, preferred pitch for music to be played at according to Prof Dussaut of the Paris conservatory (who held a poll of over 20,000 of the head classical musicians of France who all voted unanimously for A-432hz).” – Source- Radical Films

“On April 9, 1988 at a conference on “Music and Classical Aesthetics” sponsored by the Schiller Institute at the Casa Verdi in Milan, Italy, a worldwide campaign was launched to restore the lower tuning pitch of the classical composers from Bach through Verdi, a pitch based on a Middle C of 256 Hz, which in turn is grounded in the physical laws of our universe.” Source- Schiller Institute

2 Comments »

  1. I don’t understand a word you just said. But I’ll take Audios Amigos in whatever hertz you like.

    Comment by Mark Wyner — September 19, 2012 @ 5:41 pm

  2. Thanks for tuning in and turning on to the original frequency of A=432hz. Let the reawakening of the Human Race begin.

    Comment by David Peterson — January 24, 2013 @ 10:42 pm

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